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Tennis Fitness Exercises

Tennis Fitness Exercises

Tennis Fitness

Over the past year, we have seen kids as young as 12 years with tears in rotator cuffs, tendonitis in the elbow, wrist, achilles and frightening stress fractures in the shoulders and lower back. We are seeing more and more young athletes present with limited flexibility, stability and strength…

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Tennis Fitness Drills and Exercises

Most tennis players dread the process of undergoing the various intensive tennis fitness drills mentioned below, but these drills can have a substantial impact on a tennis player’s speed, agility and explosiveness on the tennis court…

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Six Exercises to Improve your Tennis Game

Tennis is a deceptively difficult sport to master. While the pros may make it look like a walk in the park, a close game of tennis can push the body to overwhelming levels of exertion…

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Tennis Players Fitness Training 2018 – Djokovic, Nadal, Dimitrov & More

 

Train Like A Tennis Player With This Conditioning Workout

If you’d like to channel their work ethic or prepare for your own competition, try this workout. You’ll notice most exercises are done while standing and focus on joint strength and mobility, since athletic training should often mimic movements of the sport.

Bodyweight exercises are a great place to start for tennis especially, so that you learn how to control your body and keep it injury-free—then add weight.

Free weights will allow you to stretch your range of motion even farther than machines allow, pushing your body to face real-life scenarios like extending a racket and bashing that ball back…

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The Tennis Workout

Rory Cordial, physical therapist and performance coach incorporates these exercises to improve strength and power, while at the same time decreasing the chance for injuries. Cordial recommends using the Thera-Bands for your warm-up and integrating the rest of the exercises into your own workout routine…

Add these six exercises to your routine to bring your game to the next level…

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How to Tape a Sprained Ankle – Sports Injury

How to Tape a Sprained Ankle – Sports Injury

Ankle Injury

Sports requiring jumping, turning and twisting movements such as basketball, volleyball, netball and football; and explosive changes of direction such as soccer, tennis and hockey are particularly vulnerable to ankle sprains.

The immediate treatment of any soft tissue injury consists of the RICER protocol – rest, ice, compression, elevation and referral. RICE protocol should be followed for 48–72 hours. The aim is to reduce the bleeding and damage within the joint. The ankle should be rested in an elevated position with an ice pack applied for 20 minutes every two hours (never apply ice directly to the skin). A correctly sized compression bandage should be applied to limit bleeding and swelling in the joint.

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How to Tape an Ankle Like an Athletic Trainer

Ankle taping is one of the most commonly recognized skills of the athletic trainer and coach interested in returning athletes to play after ankle injuries. The most effective tape prescription for an ankle sprain is designed specifically to protect the structures injured.

To help an athlete recover from a minor ankle injury it is always a good idea to tape the ankle. Taping the ankle allows for extra support while still providing mobility.

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How to Tape an Ankle

 

Learning how to tape an ankle is pretty easy to learn how to do, but is hard to perfect. This set of instructions is aimed toward people with knowledge in sports medicine. To successfully complete these instructions, people should know general anatomy, and know basic medical terms.

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How tight should you wrap a sprained ankle?

Hold your ankle at about a 90-degree angle. Start where your toes meet the body of your foot. Hold the loose end of the bandage at the side of your foot. Wrap the bandage around the ball of your foot once, keeping it somewhat taut with a light pull.

 

Use KT Tape for Ankle Stability

Ankle instability or weakness can lead to chronic sprains and tearing of ligaments and tendons and lead to other injuries. Unlike traditional ankle braces, KT Tape provides support that is very comfortable and allows you to have a greater range of motion. This application also helps to provide support without limiting your range of motion or decreasing your blood flow.

This application can be used for a variety of ankle issues including ankle sprains, stretched ligaments, inflamed tendons, or general ankle weakness. The added support will give you the confidence and support during the rehabilitation phase of an injury as well as the stability and pain relief during activity.

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How to Tape Your Own Ankle

How to tape your ankle properly for sport – clear, easy to follow instructions on how to do this properly!

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The Effectiveness of Ankle Taping

There is considerable debate over the residual effectiveness of taping over the course of a prolonged sporting session. The issue is of practical significance, as the author’s note that during soccer matches, a disproportionately high number of injuries occur during the last third of each halftime. To date, there have been few studies that have evaluated the mechanical, protective properties of tape beyond 30 minutes of exercise.

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Ankle Sprains Most Common High School Sports Injury, Study Finds

Analyzing data collected through the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System (RIO), an Internet-based reporting system, researchers found that ankle sprains accounted for16% of sports-related injuries in 20 high school sports serious enough to require medical attention by a certified athletic trainer or physician and restrict an athlete’s participation for 1 or more days.

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Effective Treatment for Plantar Fasciitis and Foot Pain

Effective Treatment for Plantar Fasciitis and Foot Pain

What is the Initial Treatment for Plantar Fasciitis?

Heel and Foot Pain (Plantar Fasciitis) – Treatment. Collectively, these initial treatments are known as ‘conservative’ treatments for plantar fasciitis… Avoid running, excess walking or standing, and undue stretching of your sole… Choose shoes with cushioned heels and a good arch support… Regular, gentle stretching of your Achilles tendon and plantar fascia may help to ease your symptoms…

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Plantar Fasciitis: Fix it Forever

The mechanism of injury in plantar fasciitis and the natural, non-surgical approach to its treatment are outlined in this video. Integrative Chiropractic care and rehabilitative protocols are the answer.

 

Save Yourself from Plantar Fasciitis!

Plantar fasciitis explained in great detail, including every possible treatment option, and all supported by recent scientific research..

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Foot Pain

Feet. They carry you from here to there every day. But you may not think much about them until they hurt. And when they do, you want relief. To get the right treatment, you need to know the problem. The first thing to consider is where your pain is located…

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Can Plantar Fasciitis Go Away on its Own?

Pain can last for several weeks or months and can range from mild to severe. Plantar fasciitis will likely go away on its own, with rest, but it may take several months or longer to resolve completely. There is treatment to help you recover faster…

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IT Band Injury Treatment and Prevention – Sports Medicine Specialist

IT Band Injury Treatment and Prevention – Sports Medicine Specialist

IT Band “Runner’s Leg” Treatment – Sports Medicine Specialist

Sports Medicine Specialist, Dr. Jonathan Wilhelm, located at Pro Chiropractic in Bozeman, MT demonstrates advanced and effective treatment approaches for iliotibial band friction syndrome (IT BAND). These include new effective treatments like Graston Technique, Kinesiology Taping, and specific Extremity Adjustments.

Dr. Jon is a Certified Chiropractic Sports Physician, and holds advanced certifications in Kinesiology taping, Graston technique, and Extremity Adjusting, as well as a Master’s Degree in Sports Science and Rehabilitation.

 

7 Exercises to Treat and Prevent IT Band Syndrome

One of the most common sources of pain that can stop runners in their tracks is iliotibial band syndrome. Frequently misunderstood, IT band syndrome is often treated incorrectly.

Common treatments include ice, rest and stretching, and, while all of these have their place in treating a running injury, ITBS is best approached proactively.

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Why Your IT Band Isn’t Getting Better

Every runner I’ve ever seen with ITBS fails to shift their weight far enough onto the sore leg. In most cases with running injuries it’s difficult to tell whether the movement pattern or the pain came first, but in this case it’s definitely the movement pattern causing the pain and not the other way around.

You can keep trying to mitigate the consequences of the knee pain this movement pattern causes by putting a support under your arch to try to prevent the knee from rotating inwards and doing things to your IT band to loosen it up, but the former rarely works and the latter means you’re actually fighting what your body is trying to do to solve the problem of your weight being in the wrong place…

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Your IT Band Is Not The Enemy (But Maybe Your Foam Roller Is)

Initially, the logic behind rolling your IT band seems fairly sound. Foam rollers increase range of motion and reduce pain. My IT bands are tight and my knees hurt. Therefore I should apply the roller to my IT bands to solve these problems, right? Unfortunately, more often than not the answer to this question is a resounding “no.” It’s quite possible you’re actually doing more harm than help and further stretching an already abused and over-elongated piece of tissue…

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Type 2 Diabetes and Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes and Exercise

Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes? Don’t Exercise Till You Read This!

You may be fearful, anxious and generally stressed out after getting a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. There’s so much to learn, which is why we’re stepping in for the exercise part. We talked to experts who treat type 2 diabetes to find out what they tell their patients about working out with diabetes…

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Golf: Return to Play after Surgery, Winter Conditioning & New Teaching Technology; Avoiding Winter Sports Injuries

Golf: Return to Play after Surgery, Winter Conditioning & New Teaching Technology; Avoiding Winter Sports Injuries

Dr. Nik Verma sitting in for Dr. Cole and Steve speak with James Standhardt from GOLFTEC about returning to play after surgery, winter conditioning, importance of club fitting and new technology in golf instruction.

Dr. Julia Bruene from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about how to avoid skiing and other winter sports injuries.

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High Velocity Training

High Velocity Training

It is clear from the research that high-velocity, low-load training is related to an ability to produce force quickly and has implications for activities of daily living as well as athletic endeavors. High velocity exercise results in specific high velocity adaptations and should be employed when attempting to increase high speed movements.

Sports that require athletes to sprint faster or jump higher may benefit from assisted training that mimics sport specific movement speeds. Since maximizing speed is one of the most desired goals for fitness and performance, implementing innovative over-speed methods within a training program can aid in maximizing performance.

In addition, short duration training is effective for the acute adaptation of neural factors, which results in an acute increase in performance in the absence of muscular hypertrophy.

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